The Self-Publishing Manual

Large Print Edition of this Popular Book “Why Not Publish Yourself?” Wouldn’t you rather make more money, get to press sooner and keep control of your work? This manual is your complete reference for writing, printing, publishing, promoting, marketing and distributing books. Whether you are promoting a published book or plan to write and publish one soon, you will refer to this manual again and again. You will discover how easy it is to: . Build your book rather than just write it-and copyright it in your name. . Multipurpose your “book” into downloadable, CD and ebook versions. . Wring maximum value out of your “book” by spinning off audiotapes, videotapes, magazine excerpts, foreign-language editions and more. . Bypass the publishers and go direct to a short-run book printer. . Set up your own publishing company and take the tax breaks. . Promote your books with email, book reviews, autographings, feature articles and radio/TV interviews. . Get your book into chain bookstores, online bookstores, specialty stores and catalogs. . Use the Internet for promotion. Appendix 2 has over 40 pages of valuable resources complete with email and Web site addresses. “This is the first book I recommend to those considering becoming a publisher.” -Jan Nathan, Executive Director, Publishers Marketing Association “One essential ingredient to our Chicken Soup success was consulting with Dan Poynter in the early stages.” -Jack Canfield, co-author, Chicken Soup for the Soul series “Dan Poynter has generously guided thousands to authorship. Their books make this a better world.” -Dr. Robert Muller, Past Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations and author of 2000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World Dan Poynter is the author of more than 80 books. His seminars have been featured on CNN, his books have been pictured in The Wall Street Journal, and his story has been told in U.S. News & World Report. The media come to him because he is the leading authority on how to write, publish and promote books. This best-selling manual on self-publishing has shown thous- ands of people the faster, surer way to break into print. What are you waiting for?The bible on self-publishing. Highly recommended by virtually everyone in the industry — even other authors of books on the subject (many of whom probably followed the advice in Poynter’s previous 11 editions).

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3 Responses to The Self-Publishing Manual

  1. Rebecca of Amazon "The Rebecca Review"

    Don’t jump into self-publishing without this manual! If you have ever felt that self-publishing is similar to jumping out of a plane without a parachute, have no fear! “The Self-Publishing Manual” is your parachute! On your way to “landing” your first published book, you will learn everything you need to know.I think of Dan Poynter as the ultimate “how-to self-publish” expert! He will teach you all the tricks of the publishing trade. As an author of more than 80 books, he also has a proven track record of success. He will convince you that you too can succeed.The strength of this encyclopedic reference is the author’s experience in publishing. Dan Poynter is also on the leading edge of technology. He welcomes the new era of book publishing and prepares writers by giving a “New Book Publishing Model.”If you are looking for a complete reference on writing, printing, publishing, promoting, marketing and distributing your new book, look no further. Whether you just have the concept for your new book or have already advanced to the promotion stage, the information you will need to make your efforts more successful is here!The “Your Book’s Calendar” section is like a true gift for the busy author. This section is vital to keeping your goals and progress in check. It will allow you to digest volumes of information in small sections. You can start with what you have started to accomplish, check the suggested readings and then check off your goals as you reach them.I especially enjoyed reading the section on professional reviewers. The glossary of publishing terms was so revealing. The “resources for publishers” section was detailed and informative.This source book also has a companion web site. You can find information kits, great book promotion mailing lists, links to useful Web sites and hundreds of downloadable documents.If you are still searching for an agent, sending out manuscripts to publishers, or writing those endless query letters, it may be time to take off that seat belt which is trapping you in that airplane seat! Then, read this book and jump! There are people who want your book. There are people who need your book. Believe it! Then, free fall to success!~The Rebecca Review

  2. Cathy Stucker "IdeaLady.com"

    Publish Profitably Publishing can be a tough business, but with the advice of Dan Poynter you can make your book a profitable reality. ‘The Self-Publishing Manual’ includes great nuts-and-bolts advice and lots of helpful resources for getting your book written, produced and distributed.

  3. Michael K. Smith

    How to be rich and famous. Or at least rich. Maybe. Poynter is the guru of a certain type of self-publishing author: The writer/hustler who is interested, first and foremost, in making money — lots and lots of money — not merely in making information available and earning enough back to make the effort worthwhile. I’ve done a certain amount of self-publishing over the past couple of decades (mostly genealogical research materials and local history), and while I’m always interested in what he has to say, I’ve frankly never found a lot of useful material here. All the way through, especially in the early chapters where he’s trying to hook you (and remember that his background is in marketing), he insists this writing-publishing thing is easy. All you do is get an idea, read everything about it, put it all in a notebook (rather quirkily for a technophile, he seems to believe in first-draft writing on paper), edit it into a new shape, and Presto! You have a new book, and it’s gonna make you rich! Or something. Among other problems, he seems to have only a hazy idea of how the acquisitions process generally works in a large library system. Not to mention comments like “library loans may hurt sales of fiction,” and “libraries tend to do most of their ordering around the beginning or end of their fiscal year.” Puh-leez. Then there’s this, regarding the Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998: “Now, anything printed prior to 1922 is safe.” Say what? (Even Cotton Mather?) He also seems to think book-indexing need involve only the “indexing” feature in Microsoft Word. Finally, on the very last page (before the omnipresent order form, that is), he says it doesn’t matter who the publisher is: “Who is the author? Is she a credible person? No one ever asks, ‘Who is the publisher’?” Au contraire, Dan, the credibility of the *publisher* can be *very* important, especially in technical books. Would you rather buy, unseen, a computer book from O’Reilly & Associates, or from Joe Blow Kitchen Table Press? However, even very narrowly market-specific titles (like genealogy) require some advertising and notification of potential purchasers, so his chapters on publicity and marketing are worth reading, as is the material on cutting-edge electronic publishing, both via CD and online.

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