Certified Refurbished Kindle Paperwhite E-reader – Black, 6″ High-Resolution Display (300 ppi) with Built-in Light, Wi-Fi – Includes Special Offers

Amazon

Product Features

  • A Certified Refurbished Paperwhite E-reader is refurbished, tested, and certified to look and work like new
  • New, higher resolution display (300 ppi)–now with twice as many pixels
  • Now with Bookerly, our exclusive font, hand-crafted from the ground up for faster reading with less eyestrain
  • Built-in adjustable light–read day and night
  • Unlike tablets, no screen glare, even in bright sunlight
  • A single battery charge lasts weeks, not hours
  • Massive selection, lowest prices–over a million titles at $2.99 or less
  • Prime members read free with unlimited access to over a thousand titles

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3 Responses to Certified Refurbished Kindle Paperwhite E-reader – Black, 6″ High-Resolution Display (300 ppi) with Built-in Light, Wi-Fi – Includes Special Offers

  1. No big improvement in the 2015 model Review updated September 17, 2015As a background, I am a retired Information Systems professional and I am writing this review from the perspective of being a long-time Kindle user. I have all the current e-readers and Fire devices from Amazon including the basic Kindle, the 2013, 2014 and new 2015 Paperwhite, the Fire HD6, Fire HD7, Fire HDX7 and Fire HDX8.9. This review is for the 2015 “All-New Kindle Paperwhite.” The attached picture shows the 2014 Kindle on the left and the new 2015 Kindle on the right. Here is the summary of my initial impressions of the 2015 model versus the 2014 model.I am somewhat disappointed in the 2015 version as there is not a huge improvement over last year’s model. The Paperwhite made many improvements from its original first generation 2012 model to its second generation 2013 model, especially in the display and processor area. The 2013 model came with 2 GB storage, a wonderful display, a great battery and was the e-book “workhorse.” The second generation 2014 model changed by only increasing storage to 4 GB. The third generation 2015 model increased the display resolution but reduced the battery life slightly.WHAT COMES IN THE BOX: A Paperwhite device, a quick-start guide and a short USB cord. Amazon still does not supply a power adapter.SIZE: It’s the same identical size as the older Paperwhites. The weight has been reduced slightly from 7.3 to 7.2 ounces, a fraction of an ounce, most likely because of a smaller battery.The good news is that all cases that fit the other Paperwhites will fit the 2015 version!!DISPLAY: The resolution has been bumped up to 300 ppi, equivalent to the Voyage. However, in practical use, I can’t tell the difference unless I put an earlier version next to the new version for comparison. Unfortunately, when I place them side-by-side, I noticed that the new Paperwhite is not quite as bright as the older models when set at the same brightness level. This is more noticeable at lower settings. Also, my Kindle has a slight shadow area along the bottom that appears as a small gray smudge and isn’t quite as evenly lit as the rest of the display. It is very small but noticeable. The logo on the bottom of the screen is now shiny black against matte black on the plastic case instead of being displayed in silver lettering. It’s difficult to see except when viewing the shiny “Kindle” reflection at an angle to light.(September 2015 update: The Kindle logo is how I tell my new 2015 Paperwhite and older Paperwhites apart. They are that similar!)BATTERY: The battery of the 2013 and 2014 Paperwhites are rated a third larger than the new model. And it is noticeable! When operating simultaneously, the new PW battery drains much faster. It is currently rated at 6 weeks of ½ hour average daily usage versus 8 weeks for the older models. That specification translates to 21 hours of use versus 28 hours of use for the older models.(September 2015 update: I was on a week-long vacation trip but forgot my chargers. I had the 2014 Kindle with me, and as I was on vacation, I read a lot. The battery lasted–barely–the entire vacation. Given the shorter battery life, the 2015 model would have lost power before I came home. Normally, this shouldn’t be an issue for most people as the 2015 battery does last a long time. But…. I am so spoilt by not having to carry a charger on trips, even long trips.)STORAGE: Nothing has changed. It comes with the same 4 GB of storage. Mine netted 2990 MB free space from the factory. This number will vary slightly from device to device depending on the actual hard drive.HARDWARE: Alas, there is still no audio with the Paperwhite. So you still can’t play songs in the background or listen to Audible books. If you need audio features, you may want to look at the Kindle Fire lineup as audio capabilities are not available on the PaperWhite, standard Kindle, or the Kindle Voyage. (September 2015 update: I still wish I could listen to Audible books like you could on the Kindle Keyboard.)Wifi: Nothing has changed. I had hoped for an upgrade to 802.11ac or at least add the less crowded 5-Ghz range of wifi. If you are in a wifi crowded area, you will need to be closer to your router to download books. While the Paperwhite does not use a lot of bandwidth, it does need to be able to communicate with a router for WhisperSync to work and to download books.It is possible that the new Kindle Paperwhite either has a slightly faster processor, or more likely, the memory has been upgraded from 512MB to 1024MB to match the Voyage. I have over a thousand books installed. To keep track of what I have, all books are added to collections, such as “Reading Queue” for those I have not read but want to read, and “Already Read” for those books I have already read. In addition, my books are also categorized by genre…

  2. A great product that’s now even better If you’re reading reviews of the new 3rd generation Paperwhite, you’re likely considering buying one. If so, you’re probably in one of these categories:* Never owned a Kindle e-ink reader* Own an older Kindle e-ink reader, but not a Paperwhite* Own a first or second generation PaperwhiteI’ll save my opinion on whether the new Paperwhite 3 is worth buying until the end of my review. (But I will say this: They’ve taken a great product and made it even better.) First, here’s a comparison of the new Paperwhite with the second generation Paperwhite (comparisons are for the wi-fi models):Second Generation Paperwhite (2013)——————————————-Size: 6.7″x4.6″x0.36″Weight (wi-fi version): 7.3 ouncesDisplay: 6″ diagonal, 212 pixels per inch, 16-level grayscale, LED frontlitStorage memory: 4GBPage turns: TouchscreenNumber of fonts: 6Display lighting: Manually adjustable front-lightingAll-New Paperwhite (2015)——————————Size: 6.7″x4.6″x0.36″Weight (wi-fi version): 7.2 ouncesDisplay: 6″ diagonal, 300 pixels per inch, 16-level grayscale, LED frontlitStorage memory: 4GBPage turns: TouchscreenNumber of fonts: 7Display lighting: Manually adjustable front-lightingNote that the physical size is identical to the older Paperwhite, so covers and sleeves that worked with the older Paperwhites are still usable (thank you, Amazon). The most obvious difference is the screen resolution: 300 pixels per inch is a major jump from the 212 pixels per inch in the older Paperwhites. With text, you may or may not notice the characters are slightly crisper, but the higher resolution is a most welcomed improvement for books that have illustrations, maps, or photographs – they’ll be noticeably most detailed.Another addition is the newly designed Bookerly font. It appears to me to be a slightly softer, more rounded font. I like it, but I’ll have to use it for a while to see if I prefer it over the Caecilia font that I usually use.Unlike backlit tablets and phones, which wash out badly in sunlight, the Paperwhite is very readable in any lighting condition from total darkness to bright sunshine, simply by adjusting the built-in lighting level. The touch screen’s responsiveness has been noticeably improved over the original Paperwhite, but I couldn’t tell any obvious difference compared to the second generation Paperwhite.About the battery life: Amazon says “A single charge lasts up to six weeks, based on a half hour of reading per day with wireless off and the light setting at 10.” People’s reading habits vary too much to generalize about battery life. Also, the lighting level will vary – for example, my preferred lighting level for the conditions where I read most of the time is 15. Unlike the Kindle Fires that show the percentage of remaining battery charge, the Paperwhites only have a crude graphic indicator. I’ve gotten into the habit of charging my Kindle about once a week, so I don’t worry about it. I also leave the wi-fi connection turned on so that the Kindle can receive any software updates when they come in.My thoughts about the “Special Offers”: To me, it’s not worth the $20 to opt out of the special offers. They’re not really intrusive, and they don’t pop up while you’re reading, and sometimes you’ll even see an offer that you like. After a while, you hardly notice the ads. My advice is to take the special offers and save $20. Later, if you find you don’t like seeing them, you can ante up the $20 and opt out.My thoughts about wi-fi only versus wi-fi + 3G: The wi-fi + 3G model is $70 more than the wi-fi only model. Nowadays with wi-fi being so available just about everywhere you go, most people won’t need 3G. However, if you do decide to get the wi-fi + 3G Paperwhite, note that that there’s no additional cost to download books over 3G (the book publishers pay that cost).One more comment: None of the Paperwhites have audio features, including text-to-speech, speaker, or headphone jack. Audio has not been included in any of the e-ink Kindles for several years, and I doubt if it will ever return. If you want to play audio books or music, Amazon wants you to buy a Kindle Fire.Note: The Paperwhite 3 comes with a USB charging cable but no charger. Any AC charger or vehicle charger that outputs 5 volts at about 1 amp should work just fine. This includes any Kindle chargers you already have, as well as most cellphone chargers.—————————————–Okay, what’s the bottom line? The new Paperwhite is a superb ebook reader, a continuing evolution of the super-popular Paperwhite series. I have the impression that Amazon has taken the Paperwhite 2 and tweaked it from top to bottom…

  3. Small changes in specifications that mean a lot to me for my reading comfort! Getting a Kindle to read with changed my life. For 50 + years I read a book every 2 days or less. As my eyes got worse, for many reasons, I just had to quit. Reading a paperback was hard and after 10 minutes of reading I simply gave up. With a Kindle I can adjust the font style and size and read for hours a day. The best straight forward reading tablet I previously owned is the Kindle Paperwhite 2013 version. This new release improves in an area that I want and one that I paid to upgrade my tablet for. The new 2015 screen has 300 PPI versus 212 PPI for the 2013 version and the screen resolution is almost twice as good as the older Kindle. The change is from 768×1024 to 1072×1448 pixels and that is a tremendous improvement and luxury for those with older eyes.One downside is that the new Kindle Paperwhite does have a lower battery life when compared to the previous generation. The battery life has dropped from 8 weeks at ½ hour of reading per day to 6 weeks at ½ hour of reading per day. That is due to the additional energy required for the higher resolution screen and the power to render the higher resolution of text. I don’t like the reduced reading time but for me this was not a big deal as it is still 21 hours of reading time (It was 28 hours on the 2013 version) and it charges quickly in 4 hours. Heck, my expensive iPad battery only lasts about 8 hours and the eyestrain is pretty tough to handle using the iPad for more than 30 minutes to read. Some people may not like this but I just recharge my Kindles every three or four days. Since the unit has a lower battery life I do believe that Amazon should have included a USB charger as someone that travels may not be carrying a laptop computer with them to charge the Kindle Paperwhite. This omission of a USB charger is still a sore point with many people. I wish Amazon would just raise the price $10 and include the charger as a standard feature!I have added a video of the Kindle Paperwhite 2013 compared to a Kindle Paperwhite 2015 and a Kindle Keyboard. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me and I will try to answer them.Things to do with your new Kindle Paperwhite:* Get a simple light weight case that will turn off the screen when you close the cover. It will help save on your battery life and protect your tablet.* Enter in a device pass code to protect your tablet in case you lose your tablet. This prevents someone from using your tablet and even from buying books using your account.* Yes you can use just about any USB charger for this Kindle Paperwhite. I use the one that came with my Kindle Keyboard unit and it works fine.I own multiple Kindle Fires, HP tablets and Apple iPads and Android tablets but the best reading device is a Kindle Paperwhite. Why? It is simply because I can read it outside in the sunlight, inside and at night with reduced eyestrain when compared to any other tablet I own. It is the read anyplace best tablet for reading hands down champion!I just love this new tablet. It offers the perfect balance of a lit screen with reduced eyestrain and high clarity and contrast of the text and a good price. It is truly a step up to a better reading device. The new reading font called Bookerly is very good for my eyes. It is crisper and bolder on the screen and I can read for longer times than before. Toss in the higher screen resolution and you have a new reading experience.I am always looking for improvements in the text and screen quality as for me that is a major issue. The print on the screen is blacker and crisper and it is easier on my eyes. Side by side with my Kindle Paperwhite 2013 the older Paperwhite text looks grey and the screen slightly yellow in comparison to this newer version. There definitely is a good improvement and that relates to more reading comfort for my eyes!This newer 2015 Paperwhite has a few new features that I like:* 300 PPI versus older 2013 Paperwhite at 212 PPI* New reading font Bookerly that is bolder and designed for use on a digital screen* 4 GB of memory versus my 2013 version that was launched with 2 GIG (Not enough for me)Reading was my number one hobby my entire life and I just loved it. The Kindle has brought back that reading experience and now with the crisper text, better font and no glare lit screen I can enjoy my reading in every type of environment. In my video I compare the Kindle Keyboard, Kindle Paperwhite 2013 and the Kindle Paperwhite 2015 side by side. The improvements are amazing.The new screen clarity is where this Paperwhite design really is outstanding. With better contrast, lighting and custom designed fonts, the text just pops out of the screen like you have not seen in an e-Reader before. With 300 PPI (Pixels Per Inch) this screen provides a 1072…

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